Why You Need to Know About #SayHerName

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Credit: Instagram

According to The Guardian, more than 70 black women have died in the last three years at the hands of police brutality, of which Shelly Frey, Kayla Moore, and Meagan Hockaday were just a few of the victims.

That in itself should be mortifying enough, but what’s equally disturbing is that these women rarely make the news, they don’t make the headlines, and they don’t get talked about. Kimberlé Crenshaw is ready to change that.

Kimberlé is the founder of the African American Policy Forum and the woman behind the hashtag #sayhername.

“More black people [in total] are killed – disproportionately to their rate in the population – and although the numbers are hard to assess, the reality is that black women are vulnerable to the same justifications used for killing black men,” she said.

Related: Rosario Dawson is the Activist Inspiration We’ve Needed

Inspired by the sad reality that black women killed by the police often go unnoticed, Kimberlé decided to start spreading the word herself. And for the first time, people are listening.

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Pictured: Kimberle Crenshaw

Kimberlé herself is a long time activist who coined the term “intersectionality” back in the 80s to describe how gender, race, sexuality, and more identity factors can affect how you experience racism, sexism, and other forms of discrimination.

“Having a monolithic view of feminism is suffocating. What worries me is when it turns vitriolic and tracks on to other ways that women are marginalized. So, to call women old and out of touch is a traditional way to silence them. Nor do you want the trope of young and unaware to travel without interrogation. We don’t want to undermine our collective voice.”

In the last week alone, #sayhername has been tweeted over 700 times, reaching more than 7.6 million people on the social media platform.

To learn more about the campaign and about Kimberlé’s goals, check out AAPF here.

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